Lifestyle News | Fashion, Food, Health, Music, Travel, and TV News - iZimbabwe http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw Thu, 17 Apr 2014 01:22:50 +0200 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Understanding Kosher Food: A visit to Bnei Brak, Israel http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34844-understanding-kosher-food-a-visit-to-bnei-brak-israel.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34844-understanding-kosher-food-a-visit-to-bnei-brak-israel.html
A visit to Bnei Brak, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Community

I visit Bnei Brak to learn more about kosher food for Fine Dining Lovers

a deli in Bnei Brak

a deli in Bnei Brak

Its’ a few hours before Shabbat and we are five minutes out of Tel Aviv, more or less, in the orthodox community of Bnei Brak. I’m nervous, if I must be honest. I’m wearing a long-sleeved shirt, buttoned to

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A visit to Bnei Brak, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Community

I visit Bnei Brak to learn more about kosher food for Fine Dining Lovers

a deli in Bnei Brak

a deli in Bnei Brak

Its’ a few hours before Shabbat and we are five minutes out of Tel Aviv, more or less, in the orthodox community of Bnei Brak. I’m nervous, if I must be honest. I’m wearing a long-sleeved shirt, buttoned to my suprasternal notch and long, loose trousers. I have not spotted a single female, aged 4 to 94, wearing pants. My idea was to blend in respectfully, as far as possible, and that seems more of a challenge than I expected. My husband places a comforting hand on my arm; I shrug it off and give him the look, “No touching, remember?” I whisper.

Hagit Evron, dressed in a long white skirt and a pink cardigan, meets us on a food tour of the neighbourhood. Moments, later the skies open. It’s the first rain of the season, she tells as we huddle under an awning, watching a stream of Haredim (Hasidic Jews, male in this case), dressed in black tailcoats, dark hats with impressive dangling curled side burns, walk by.  They are dressed similarly to their ancestors from the 18th and 19th centuries and are unmistakable, whether spotted in Brooklyn or here in Bnei Brak. We learn that the community is divided into several sub groups, each with distinctive dress and hats.

Our first stop is a small deli, Maadanei Zehava, crammed with predominately male customers, served by the Cohen family men. Hagit and I are distinctly out of place in the gender balance of things as they are here. Women are homemakers and rarely seen outside on a Friday afternoon.

Brothers in arms

Brothers in arms

In the deli, the twin Cohen brothers enthusiastically show us impressive platters of smoked salmon. We taste the slow cooked zulnt (cholent), a beef and barley stew that is cooked all of Friday for the lunch on Saturday. Kept in a huge pot on a slow simmer, it’s tender and comforting.  The Ashkenazi Jewish dish ofkugel, massive potato and egg-noodle cakes, with browned tops and slightly sweet in flavour are cut into wedges and sold on polystyrene plates.

We sample smoked salmon on crackers with purple-hued horseradish and beet cream. Hagit points out the dips and herring in the fridge.

At Shtisel, a nearby diner we try to engage with Efraim behind the counter. I want to purchase some items to take back to the apartment in Tel Aviv. I pick a few gefilte fish balls.

“No Shabbat table is complete without this, the zulnt and kugel,” says Hagit.

a few classic Shabbat foods

a few classic Shabbat foods

Efraim is polite but refuses to look at the camera, but from behind us, Hagit notices some interest. A group of teenage boys, dressed in black coats and hats, their sideburns curled in the traditional way, are whispering. “They are fascinated by you,” Hagit says, pointing to my brown skin.

One comes forward to the fridge and we ask if he’d like to be in a picture. He smiles, revealing braces and proceeds to play shopper for our pictures, selecting from the fridge, deep in thought, perhaps like his own father or uncles.

Men and women are rarely seen together in public spaces. Even at a diner like this one.

Specialist bakeries like Katz Bakery produce kosher pastries, breads and cakes made without dairy, known as parve, that can be consumed with or just after eating meat. Like the number of kosher certifications on all food products here, there are ‘levels’ of kosher bakeries, and the stricter the certification, the more expensive the product. Different communities within the neighbourhood ascribe to different marks of certification.

At Hazvi Bakery, people from all over the area, orthodox and secular come to buy loaves of challah. Trolleys stacked with hot bread with a dark brown sheen, are replaced almost as fast as they come out. We leave with a large plaited challah loaf sprinkled with sesame seeds. We take a taxi back to our parked cars, aware that movement outside a certain hour on a Friday in orthodox neighbourhoods is frowned upon.

Hagit’s tours in Bnei Brak and Jerusalem cater mainly to locals. I ask her why she, a secular Israeli runs them. “Food is known to melt barriers, and by doing these tours, connecting Israelis and visitors with real people in this nieghbourhood, I am hoping to supply a more tolerant approach to the orthodox community,” she explains.

Five minutes later we are in Tel Aviv, and patrons, male and female sit on terraces of cafes, drinking wine and smoking, chatting and laughing. The contradiction we have just witnessed is stark.

parve pastries

parve pastries

Kosher (kashrut) – the basics
  • Traditional Jewish food is not necessarily kosher
  • Kosher means to be ‘fit’ or ‘proper’ and must comply with Jewish dietary laws. The basic reason for following kosher is related to obeying religious instruction.
  • Animals must have split hooves and chew the cud to qualify. Pigs don’t qualify.
  • Fish must have both scales and fins. Seafood like lobster, prawns, squid, eel are not kosher.
  • Birds with grasping claws (birds of prey) are not kosher but chicken, ducks, geese and turkeys all qualify.
  • Animals must be slaughtered by a qualified rabbi and blood drained. Authorised kosher labeling should be prominent.
  • Meat and diary should not be consumed together. Sufficient time should pass before one or the other is eaten. This varies
  • A kosher kitchen must have separate utensils and crockery for preparation of meat and dairy.
  • Produce must not contain insects or bugs  pesticides must be used. In Israel the land on which produce is grown must lay fallow every 7 years

 

challah bread

challah bread

 

The post Understanding Kosher Food: A visit to Bnei Brak, Israel appeared first on Food and the Fabulous.

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Food Mon, 10 Mar 2014 23:19:00 +0200
Featured: Food Home Entertaining Feb 2014 http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34842-featured-food-home-entertaining-feb-2014.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34842-featured-food-home-entertaining-feb-2014.html
Featured: Food & Home Entertaining

Food & Home Entertaining Feb 2014,  did a feature on the objects we collect.

Here I am , featured with my small fabric collection  from markets, kiosks and material shops from Cambodia to Sapança.

Food and home entertaining

The post Featured: Food & Home Entertaining Feb 2014 appeared first on Food and the Fabulous....

Featured: Food & Home Entertaining

Food & Home Entertaining Feb 2014,  did a feature on the objects we collect.

Here I am , featured with my small fabric collection  from markets, kiosks and material shops from Cambodia to Sapança.

Food and home entertaining

The post Featured: Food & Home Entertaining Feb 2014 appeared first on Food and the Fabulous.

Read more http://www.foodandthefabulous.com/featured-articles/featured/

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Food Mon, 10 Mar 2014 22:48:00 +0200
Dubai through the Food of the People http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34843-dubai-through-the-food-of-the-people.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34843-dubai-through-the-food-of-the-people.html
Dubai through the Food of the People  a food tour of the city

Published in Sunday Times Extra 2 March 2014. Images in article by Rob Cumming 

Dubai foodThere is far more to Dubai than high-rise buildings, shopping malls and desert safaris. Arva Ahmed, a food guide, helps guests to piece together the cultural fabric of the city, through food exploration

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Dubai through the Food of the People  a food tour of the city

Published in Sunday Times Extra 2 March 2014. Images in article by Rob Cumming 

Dubai foodThere is far more to Dubai than high-rise buildings, shopping malls and desert safaris. Arva Ahmed, a food guide, helps guests to piece together the cultural fabric of the city, through food exploration tours.

The buildings are drab in this neighbourhood of old Dubai close to Dubai Creek, especially if you’ve spent the day in the glittering company of the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, and lunched at the swanky Address Hotel, nearby.  Bland concrete apartment blocks dwarf the sky and neon signs flicker over restaurants. We are here to meet food guide Arva Ahmed who runs Frying Pan Adventures, the only dedicated food tour in the United Arab Emirates.

To define the cuisine of Dubai, or the Emirates, means we need to understand who the people are that make up the region. Emiratis comprise just 19% of the population, with an overwhelming majority being foreigners. A mere 20 years ago Dubai was nothing more than a trading port surrounded by the Arabian Desert. Today, it is a cosmopolitan metropolis.

“The original cuisine of the Emirati people is one of the desert – it’s rich in camel milk, dates and fish for those living near the coast,” says Ahmed. Apart from dates, citrus and mangoes, around 70% of produce is imported into Dubai. Along with influences due to trade, with India and Iran, and the influx of immigrants, there is evidence of cultural crossover in dishes such as salona (currries) and machboos (a type of breyani).

Traditional dishes such as balaleet, a sweetened vermicelli made with egg that is popular for breakfast, thareed, a meat stew made with layers of flat bread and luqaimat, small drop dumplings drizzled with date molasses, are typical Emirati food, but not as easy to find as you’d imagine. At Al Farnar restaurant in Festival City, you can taste these original dishes that claim to celebrate Dubai of old.

Dubai through the Food of the People

Image: Airspective Media. Arva in orange

On her tour, Ahmed says that people are surprised to discover that Arabic, or Middle Eastern food represents a very small portion of what Dubai and the Emirates has to offer. “I try to step out of the comfort zone of hummus and falafels and talk about specific cultures and their specialty foods, rather than an blanket notion of what Arabic food must be,” explains Ahmed.

So, what foods can visitors expect to discover? Dishes range from Jordan, Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Iran and Turkey. While Lebanese and Indian food dominate the culinary landscape, every dish or element chosen for the tour has a story.

“Ghiath is an ice-cream maker who moved here from Syria, bringing a delicate, chewy pistachio-studded ‘booza’ to my street,” says Ahmed. I was lucky enough to witness Ghaith in action and to taste the fruits of his patient labour, and can attest to its greatness.

During the tour Ahmed provides an endless supply of well-researched facts, as she unpacks culinary Dubai. She is humourous and entertaining, giving ‘pop quizzes’ whenever the group lulls into silence, a natural consequence of five hours of feasting.

To enjoy this dinner party, as Ahmed aptly calls it, guests are required to be well rested, hungry and open-minded.

Book a tour: www.fryingpanadventures.com

I highly recommend a visit to the Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Centre for Cultural Understanding, for a session with a local Emirati (usually woman), a meal and a frank Q&A where guests are invited to ask all sorts of questions pertaining to traditional dress obligations, to adultery consequences, polygamy and womens education. Its a must-do on a visit to Dubai. Open doors, open minds is their motto.

Disclaimer: DTCM SA & Definitely Dubai hosted me on a Tastes of Dubai tour. As always, all views expressed here are my own and Food and the Fabulous retains full editorial control. 

Dubai through the Food of the People


Enjoying manousheh at our Lebanese bakery stop. Image: Airspective media

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Food Mon, 10 Mar 2014 22:26:00 +0200
Food Foraging in South Africa http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34764-food-foraging-in-south-africa.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34764-food-foraging-in-south-africa.html
Food Foraging in South Africa

Published by Mango Juice Inflight February 2014

Exploring the mulch-rich forest beds under the slopes of the Simonsberg Mountains at Delheim estate in Stellenbosch, visitors are led on a mushroom hunt with local experts. Foraging for food, edible plants specifically, is an exciting and growing pursuit in the rural and

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Food Foraging in South Africa

Published by Mango Juice Inflight February 2014

Exploring the mulch-rich forest beds under the slopes of the Simonsberg Mountains at Delheim estate in Stellenbosch, visitors are led on a mushroom hunt with local experts. Foraging for food, edible plants specifically, is an exciting and growing pursuit in the rural and urban landscape in South Africa.

Food Foraging.pdf-page-001

Mushroom Magic
Food Foraging in South Africa

Gary Goldman aka The Mushroom Hunter

“I want to start a mushroom revolution, “ says Gary Goldman, an enthusiastic forager and cultivator who goes by the fitting moniker, ‘The Mushroom Guru’. “I see foreigners picking wild mushrooms in our forests and I don’t want South Africans to miss out.”

From March each year, normally the start of the season, Goldman accompanies Nora Sperling Thiel, manager at Delheim estate, herself is an avid mushroom forager, on excursions arranged for visitors. Dressed in denims and sturdy walking shoes, armed with baskets and knives, the foragers use the knowledge imparted by Goldman’s lecture to identify poisonous and edible mushroom on the estate. From pine-ring mushrooms to ceps, which are popularly used in risotto, the foragers gather mushrooms under Goldman’s tutelage, to be rewarded later with a multi-course mushroom themed lunch.

Whereas Thiel picked up the basics from her mother, Goldman is mostly self-taught. “When I started foraging for mushrooms, I could not find a mushroom expert to ask what was edible and what wasn’t. So, I taught myself. After several years of identifying mushrooms from my collection of books, I can now identify them with confidence,” says Goldman who assists people with identification through his website, Mushroom Guru.

While there is an influx of Asian or ‘exotic’ mushrooms for sale in supermarkets, it is impossible to purchase local wild mushrooms, save for a few market stalls. Yet, they are available in abundance to the trained eye. In countries like Italy, France and Russia, mushroom foraging is as acceptable as taking a walk.

In the Ancestors’ Footsteps
Shaun Schoeman

Shaun Schoeman

 Chef Shaun Schoeman runs Fyndraai restaurant at Solms Delta outside Franschhoek. One of their aims is to reinstate the importance of foods foraged by the Khoe, known collectively today as the Khoisan, who are Schoeman’s forebears.

“At first I wasn’t sure if I could find inspiration in koekemakranka, kaaings and kraakbrood  let alone give them contemporary appeal,“ he confides. “The idea for a veldfood indigenous garden came from Dr Renata Coetzee, food scientist and historian.”

The author of the book Koekemakranka, Coetzee studied over many years the food ways and habits of the Khoisan and assisted Solms Delta in cultivating an essential sustainable garden with many of the long-forgotten and endangered indigenous herbs, roots, melons and flowers. This educational kitchen garden is open to visitors of the estate. In embarking on this project, Coetzee effectively prompted Schoeman to reconnect with his own estranged roots.

“Now I am an enthusiastic believer in the importance of veldfood, and convinced that food can unite cultures and help South Africans not only to understand each other better, but also to take pride in their heritage, “ he says.

Visitors to Fyndraai can enjoy dishes that contain buchu with its citrus aroma and flavourful leaves, wild garlic, t’samma and makataan melons, num-nums (Natal wild plums) and the striking perfumed koekemakranka that bears a solitary white and yellow flower and blooms for two days, once every year.

Foraging in its true sense has needed a helping hand in the case of indigenous Khoisan plants, but without this cultivated garden, we may have lost an important cultural culinary component of South African heritage.

The Urban Gatherers  
Food Foraging in South Africa

A nasturtium seed, which will be preserved as a caper  pic by Pete Zam

      

Charles Standing is holding onto the edge of a fence over a busy road, as he gathers red num-nums. No stranger to a bit of a thrill, Standing, a stunt coordinator, has channeled his years of foraging into a cookbook by the name of the Urban Hunter Gatherer.

Standing guides people through walks in urban areas, mostly in the suburbs, pointing out edible weeds, succulents and fruit like the ‘delicious monster’ and sour figs. His philosophy is to encourage sharing of neighbourhood fruit and vegetables and to discourage waste. “I know of people who buy lemons at the supermarkets when the have ripe lemons in their gardens. Through food, I try to make people aware that our resources are precious.”

Num Num fruit

Num Num fruit

Born to a Greek family in Chicago in the United States, Athena Lamberis spent her childhood picking dandelion, crab apples and mulberries with her mother. She moved to South Africa in 2008 and was overwhelmed by the glut of untapped urban edibles. “Living in a city with a beautiful natural setting, we would identify shrubs and edible plants we already knew. This extended to learning about medicinal plants indigenous to the Cape Floral Kingdom,” she says.

Athena’s Tips for Urban Foraging

Food Foraging.pdf-page-002

1.  Go on an urban safari in your neighborhood. Research the leaves, fruit and herbs you pick at home before you eat anything.

2. Accompany an experienced friend or guide.

3. Think of urban landscapes as a living and growing food farm.  As your confidence grows, you’ll become in tune with the cycles and seasons.

4. Visit local nurseries to familiarise yourself with the plants, in order to aid identification.

5. Borrow or buy a glossary of herbs or indigenous plants.

6. Educated yourself by attending talks and workshops.

7. Contact your municipality to plant common food trees in local parks such as fig, pomegranate, waterberry, and wild olive.

8. Start with easily identifiable herbs like rosemary and lavender. Use them in salves and strain in hot water.

9.  Avoid high traffic areas that are often sprayed with chemicals

10. Always wash plants/fruits before you prepare them.

Food Foraging in South Africa

Loubie Rusch collecting late season Veldkool and Dune Spinach

Loubie Rusch of Making Kos, a long-time landscape designer who leads workshops and cooking classes on urban foraging, has taken matters a step further by bottling and preserving her finds for sale.

“Collecting food close to where you live isn’t a foreign concept. It’s simply what people have always done,” says Rusch.

She hopes that some plants will be grown in suburban gardens, and in some cases farmed commercially, to be more easily available in the mainstream.

“Spekboom is a wonderplant I would be glad to see far more commonly grown, because it is delicious and for the extraordinary role it can play in carbon sequestration – at the moment I can’t get my hands on enough of it,” she explains.

Reluctant to broadcast about slower growing or more rare edible plants, or about consuming too many plant roots, Rusch is firm about encouraging sustainable foraging.

Typically Rusch uses wild rosemary and sage, sour figs, num-num fruit, waterberries, and wild plums  all of which are commonly found planted on Cape Town pavements.

“When I sell bottled indigenous ingredients at the Oranjezicht City Farm market, I place samples of the plants on the table so that people can recognise what I have used, “ she explains.

“It is so obvious to me that eating food which comes from where you live makes total sense, from both a personal health as well as a carbon footprint perspective. I am trying to get others to see the pleasure in it as well,” says Rusch, a message shared by her compatriot foragers, both urban and rural.

Food Foraging.pdf-page-003

Athena Lamberis

Athena Lamberis

Useful Websites:

www.mushroomguru.co.za

http://www.solms-delta.co.za/

www.theurbanhuntergatherer.com

www.theculinarylinguist.wordpress.com

 www.facebook.com/pages/Making-KOS

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Food Mon, 03 Mar 2014 17:59:00 +0200
I See a Different You – SCENE Magazine http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34697-i-see-a-different-you-scene-magazine.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34697-i-see-a-different-you-scene-magazine.html
I See a Different You  SCENE Magazine

Published in SCENE Magazine, Feb 2014

I see a different you

I see a different you

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three lads from Pimville, Soweto in Johannesburg, are slowly changing the way we view townships and African life, by creating stylized, sartorial visuals of themselves in ordinary settings. The

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I See a Different You  SCENE Magazine

Published in SCENE Magazine, Feb 2014

I see a different you

I see a different you

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three lads from Pimville, Soweto in Johannesburg, are slowly changing the way we view townships and African life, by creating stylized, sartorial visuals of themselves in ordinary settings. The portraits encapsulate their experience of Soweto and the places they visit, without altering the grittiness and sometimes, shabbiness, of the setting. These images have come to represent the I See a Different You (ISADY) vision.

I sit down on a park bench in Pimville and chat to twin brothers, Innocent and Justice Mukheli. Vuyo Mpantsha, the third member of the collective is on his way.

From the start, the Mukheli brothers emphasize the importance of community, friendship and mentorship in their journey to date. The three work at advertising agencies Ogilvy and Draft FCB by day, and spend their free time photographing, illustrating, and directing shoots. That’s when they are not travelling on ISADY assignments around the world. This is their definition of being ‘creatives’, it isn’t just one thing.

“We weren’t academics at school. We had to convince our mum that we could be successful without a formal education,” Justice explains after sharing that he and Innocent are dyslexic.

”Mum was worried we’d end up with the guys on the streets. She agreed to support us if we promised we’d be the best artists we could be.

“Now that we’ve got some of the world’s attention, we can sell some of our ideas with ISADY,” says Innocent. The brothers finish each other’s sentences, handing over the conversation periodically.

Dressed in fitted tweed trousers and smart tailored shirts, one sourced at a thrift store, they are undeniably stylish, and each element, including facial hair has been carefully curated to present a certain image. “People judge the package first,” says Innocent.

When Vuyo, dressed in denim dungarees and an edgy shweshwe print shirt joins, the brothers relax into an easy rhythm of friendly banter.

“This is what we do. Always playing,” says Vuyo who helped the brothers learn the more technical aspects of photography. ”We’re still learning,“ says Justice, “but what’s important is you must have an eye for composition.”

“Our images are honest. We hardly process them,” says Innocent.

On the subject of twins having similar interests in adulthood, the Mukhelis laugh. “When we were younger we couldn’t stand each other. We liked all the same things, even girls. Then we developed a healthy rivalry. When we were in grade 10 we realized that we would benefit more if we helped each other,” says Innocent.

Wherever we go, young men get out of cars to shake hands with the trio, exchanging greetings.

Weekends are spent cycling, sometimes from Sandton, 45 km away, to Soweto where they spend most weekends, and brainstorming business ideas.

“Soweto grounded us. She gave us our street smarts. And the vibe is here,” says Vuyo.

When I ask about their future plans, Innocent says, “We talk about our dreams everyday. We plan and strategize. But the only difference between you and another talented guy is making it happen.”

Note: Limited edition prints available soon.

http://iseeadifferentyou.tumblr.com/

 

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Food Mon, 24 Feb 2014 22:03:00 +0200
Tel Aviv – Tasting Guide http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34696-tel-aviv-tasting-guide.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34696-tel-aviv-tasting-guide.html
Tel Aviv  Tasting Guide. What to eat in the City

For Fine Dining Lovers

Ori Habshush

Ori Habshush

Explore the old markets and side streets, as well as the bars and delis being reinvented by young chefs and entrepreneurs. Tel Avis is a city of tantalising food gems. This is a tasting guide of some of my favourite spots in the city.

“Ah, Tel Aviv,” he smiles w

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Tel Aviv  Tasting Guide. What to eat in the City

For Fine Dining Lovers

Ori Habshush

Ori Habshush

Explore the old markets and side streets, as well as the bars and delis being reinvented by young chefs and entrepreneurs. Tel Avis is a city of tantalising food gems. This is a tasting guide of some of my favourite spots in the city.

“Ah, Tel Aviv,” he smiles wistfully. I’m getting used to the reaction from locals whenever I mention that I am heading to Tel Aviv for a few days. For Israelis, Tel Aviv seems to embody a mythical allure – modern, liberal, non-stop fun. An anomaly in a country of cultural contrasts and supposed internal divide, Tel Aviv is home to the artist, the vagabond, the business- savvy and the beach bum. To a visitor, it is a quiet miracle that Tel Aviv functions as it does, almost as if by its own will and certainly on its own terms.

It is also a city of great food and a burgeoning, modern culinary scene.

Rothschild Boulevard

juice bar Rothschild

juice bar Rothschild

The length of Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Aviv is dotted along the centre with espresso kiosks, pastry and sandwich dens and fresh juice bars. Restaurants, bars and gelato outlets line the edges. Runners, roller bladers, dog walkers and pram- pushers swerve past the coffee crowd, and in any given moment you’d be forgiven for thinking you were in a lush arrondissement in tree-lined Paris or Barcelona.

Considered a heritage site due to the number of Bauhaus buildings present, it is worth taking a walk in the late afternoon along Rothschild Boulevard, said to be the city’s most upmarket, and stopping for a drink and snack at the kiosks in the middle of the road.

Must visit: Espresso Bar, cnr Rothschild and Herzl (first opened 1910), Max Brenner, 45 Rothschild Boulevard – expensive chocolates and sit-in café.

Markets

Tel Aviv – Tasting Guide

Levinski

The spice and dried goods market in Florentin stretches over a number of blocks and is a reflection of the mix of people who have settled in the area. Iranians, Yemenites, North Africans and Eastern Europeans form the fabric of the market. You need to weave your way along the streets and side streets, touching, tasting, buying small samples to try before you return for the mixes and blends you want to take home. There has been a slow gentrification, as is the case in most old areas, with shops revamped for a younger generation’s tastes. Vegan friendly and gluten-free versions of products are making an appearance. One thing you should not miss, is a tour with passionate food guide (‘Sherpa’, she prefers to be called), Inbal Baum of Delicious Israel.

Must visit: 

Habshsuh Spices – discreet off-street entrance to a small den with high quality spices for retail and individual sale. The shop was founded in 1921 by the owner’s grandfather.

 18 Hahalutzim

Yom Tov Delicatessen

The Good Day Deli, run by Yom Levi and his family sells an exquisite selection of olives, olive oils cheeses and meats. They prepare eye-catching platters too.
43 Levinsky

the good day deli

the good day deli

Carmel Market (Shuk HaCarmel)

This loud and lively fresh produce market is a great way to observe the culinary habits of locals. It’s a mix of young and old patrons, some of whom travel far for the freshest Shabbat dinner ingredients. Coffee and beer bars dot the market and provide needed relief for weary feet.

Must: visit the Yemenite Quarter for the hole-in-the-wall restaurants. Ask around for Irit, a fun and enterprising woman who makes a mean pan of spicy shakshuka (eggs in tomato sauce) served with lavash bread.

Falafel

HaKosem – a self-service restaurant with outdoors seating, this is reputed to be the best in the city. Try the bowl of fresh, herby falafel with hummus and a shwarma with falafel and toppings.

Hummus

It’s well known that hummus is a huge deal in Israel and families and friends have known to feud over loyalties. Abu Hasan / Ali Karavan comes highly recommended for plates of masabacha- silky folds of smooth hummus topped with warm chickpeas and olive oil.

1 Ha Dolfin Street, Jaffa

Breakfast

Manta Ray

Manta Ray is loved by locals and visitors, with an ideal location, just meters from the Mediterranean sea. Book for breakfast outdoors and enjoy it slowly as sunbathers and revelers gather on the beach adjacent.

Alma Beach, Tel Aviv  

Benedict

A budget breakfast option that is open 24 hours a day, few things could be more appealing.

29 Rothschild Blvd 

Montefiore Hotel

It’s the posh option for ladies who lunch and private parties. I recommend it for pre or post breakfast coffee on the balcony, to people-watch. The main event can be a bit disappointing, but the pastries are excellent.

36 Montefiore Street 

Arab food
diners at Salimi

diners at Salimi

Haj Kahil

Lauded for the Iranian food, the mains are enormous so pace yourself if you order a mezze selection for starters. Service can be brisk.

Raziel, 18, Clock Square, Jaffa

Salimi

Persian canteen run by the same family for generations. It’s packed at lunch time. The stews, soups and braised wild herbs are popular.
80 Nachalet Binyamin Street

Food with a Vibe

North Abraxes

Small and cosy, with a bar dining option, food is simple but excellent. If lamb is on the menu, order it. Worth booking in advance.

40 Lilenbloom St. 

Nanuchka

A restaurant bar that serves excellent Georgian food and manages to do so while maintaining a vibrant party atmosphere. It does get loud. Book a place at the crowded bar and hang onto it.

28 Lilenbloom St. 

Cafés

Puah

Located at the Jaffa flea market, Puah is decorated with a collection of bric-a-brac from the surrounding market. It’s the perfect place for brunch between browsing.

8 Rabbi Yohanan Street, Jaffa

Caffe Kaymak

Young, hip café with a vegan menu and inventive drinks.

Levinsky 49

 

Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv

 

 

 

 

The post Tel Aviv  Tasting Guide appeared first on Food and the Fabulous.

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Food Mon, 24 Feb 2014 20:49:00 +0200
Lunch Box Treats for Elle SA http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34690-lunch-box-treats-for-elle-sa.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34690-lunch-box-treats-for-elle-sa.html
Lunch Box Treats for Elle SA

Elle Magazine asked me to share some lunch box treats for balanced meals and an ice tea recipe. In the March 2014 issue of Elle SA, available now.

LIVING_Dig_in -page-001

 

Were back to school and work, and the quest to prepare healthy meals after
a holiday of overindulgence has commenced. Variety and keeping it fun, and
easy is the

...
Lunch Box Treats for Elle SA

Elle Magazine asked me to share some lunch box treats for balanced meals and an ice tea recipe. In the March 2014 issue of Elle SA, available now.

LIVING_Dig_in -page-001

 

Were back to school and work, and the quest to prepare healthy meals after
a holiday of overindulgence has commenced. Variety and keeping it fun, and
easy is the key, shares food and travel writer Ishay Govender-Ypma

*Lunches for grown-ups*

You got to prepare a list of ingredients for the week or a few days, so you
dont fall into the greasy canteen or take-away trap. When youre at work
or your desk, that should be your priority, and not a desperate search for
munchies.

1. Roast extra vegetables at dinner. Add these to your lunch box with a
light dressing on the side
2. Turn left over roast chicken into salads with cucumber, pecan nuts and
dried cranberries. Or make sandwiches with pesto
3. Heat chickpeas in a pan with a little ground cumin, cardamom and
cinnamon. Add to salads for a flavour boost, and to fill you up *salad tip*
- buy good quality lunch boxes and store dressings separately so vegetables
retain their crunch
4. Keep fruit such as apples, bananas, pears, berries or citrus within easy
reach to eat when hunger strikes.
5, Make a trail mix of nuts, goji berries, cacao nibs and seeds. Keep in an
airtight jar. Limit yourself to 2 tablespoons a day  its very moreish.
7. Prepare for afternoon slumps, by keeping raw almonds, a few blocks of
dark chocolate, plain yoghurt or home-made spinach or kale chips close by
8. Try to eat lunch away from the computer where you can be mindful of what
you put in your mouth. Were more inclined to overeat crunchy foods, and
this is s why a bag of crisps can disappear in minutes when we are
distracted. Substitute with cucumber and celery sticks and home-made hummus
or  low fat yoghurt with mint.

Lunch Box Treats for Elle SA*Images:Chicken in Pita with Yoghurt dressing*

*Lunch for kids*

1. If kids are fussy bread eaters, use wraps to create pinwheels
2. Get them used to eating leftovers from dinner- such as chicken or
veggies in sandwiches
3. Baby carrots are easy to hold and fit neatly into lunch boxes
4. Always try to add their favourite fruit and dried fruit to the lunch box
5. snack ideas: small pots of low fat yoghurts, little bags of home-made
popcorn and almonds with cranberries
6. make low sugar ice teas for juice bottles or flavour water with honey
and apple juice
7. Keep a cookie cutter nearby for days you have a few more minutes and
shape sandwiches into hearts or fun shapes.

Drinks: home made ice teas (fresh juices do not last beyond a few hours in
the fridge)
http://www.foodandthefabulous.com/drinks/berry-rose-iced-tea-cape-heat-survival-guide/http://www.foodandthefabulous.com/drinks/berry-rose-iced-tea-cape-heat-survival-guide/>
and
http://www.foodandthefabulous.com/drinks/cape-heat-meet-le-fruity-iced-tea/http://www.foodandthefabulous.com/drinks/cape-heat-meet-le-fruity-iced-tea/>

Dinner party guests: Giles Coren, Dr Kenneth Kaunda, Judge Navi Pillay, Commander
Chris Hadfield*

The post Lunch Box Treats for Elle SA appeared first on Food and the Fabulous.

Read more http://www.foodandthefabulous.com/featured-articles/lunch-box-treats-elle-sa/

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Food Mon, 24 Feb 2014 13:07:00 +0200
Revival of Interest in South African Township Food http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34678-revival-of-interest-in-south-african-township-food.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/food/item/34678-revival-of-interest-in-south-african-township-food.html
Revival of Interest in South African Township Food  Kasi Cuisine

For SAA  Sawubona February 2014

With the emergence of a greater street food presence in South African towns and cities, a spotlight has been shone on the original foods of the townships, ‘kasi’ or ‘loxion’ food. Tourists, local and foreign are flocking back to the source, as the

...
Revival of Interest in South African Township Food  Kasi Cuisine

For SAA  Sawubona February 2014

With the emergence of a greater street food presence in South African towns and cities, a spotlight has been shone on the original foods of the townships, ‘kasi’ or ‘loxion’ food. Tourists, local and foreign are flocking back to the source, as the delicacies and home comforts of Madiba’s youth are finding a place of their own in the mainstream.

township food

township food

Madiba’s Plate

Sheila and Blackie Tempi

Sheila Tempi (62) is sipping on a glass of amarhewu, her morning pick-me-up. “This will take me to lunch time,” she explains of the fermented maize meal drink. Tempi, along with her jazz musician husband Blackie (60), host traditional Xhosa and ‘Madiba’s favourities’ meals at their tidy home in Langa, Cape Town.

Xoliswa Ndoyiya, Madiba’s personal chef has released a cookery book Ukutya Kwasekhaya: Tastes from Nelson Mandelas Kitchen, which has sparked a renewed interest in his beloved foods, as well as the staples of the Xhosa peoples. Perhaps it is tragic that the interest from tourists also came at the time that Mandela was gravely ill. Nonetheless, cooks like Tempi are putting their history on the plate when they open up their homes to curious visitors. Interest in South African township food, kasi cuisine, is on the rise.

“People want to know about his life as a young man,” says Blackie Tempie, whose parents and grandparents share a common background to Mandela, having lived in a nearby village in the Eastern Cape. “We all had a similar experience in our childhood, tending to livestock from the age of six, fetching water for the house from the age of seven and working in the vegetable garden after school,” he shares.

The Madiba lunch at the Tempi’s starts with glasses of chilled home-brewed ginger beer and ninkobe, dried maize that is boiled and fried like popcorn, a Madiba favourite. A glass of amarhewu is offered before the meal, and the localstaple umngqusho, samp and beans, is served with umleqwa or ‘running chicken’, which is a slow-cooked free-range chicken stew. Umfino, orspinach, mixed with maize and cabbage, another Mandela special, accompanies it.

“You know, Madiba loved sweet things after prison. He was catching up for all that time,” says Tempie as she recites her recipe for the trifle she serves.

umleqa on umngqusho

When asked why the lunch is popular, Blackie explains, ”People come because Sheila cooks and I entertain them. We have had guests who don’t want to leave. But, there needs to be a drive to expose older people to come in to our townships and to feel safe.”

Michael Letlala, operations manager at Coffee Beans Routes, a story-telling tour agency in Cape Town, adds, “Lunches and dinners like this one encourage integration. We need to create more platforms where we can meet one another as humans and share our positive memories.”

home-made ginger beer

Bright Lights, Kasi Cooking

 

Katlego Mlambo and Lerato Kganyago Katlego Mlambo (25) is a chef de partie at Rust en Vrede, a fine dining restaurant in Stellenbosch. Mlambo is also the star of a new television show Kasi-licious, that showcases township food, with the aim of educating both a young and older audience, and demystifying certain foods.

He gives the following example, ”I think that as South Africans we don’t actually realise how much our cultures overlap. A smiley is eaten in the kasi but sheep’s head is also something that is enjoyed in the Afrikaans community; the same goes for liver and tripe.”

On the show Mlambo, who always dreamt of becoming a television chef, interviews a range of popular personalities and they take him to their favourite kasi food haunts. He recreates the dishes in his kitchen, giving them a modern, sophisticated twist.

“The kasi is a place where people that might not still be living there, will go for a taste of home, and comfort. I want to show the people who have never been to the kasi that this is the kind of food that we eat, and it’s actually not so different from the food you might be having for dinner,“ he says.

Mlambo emphasizes the importance of creating and cherishing food memories, and hopes to give viewers an insight into important work being done in those communities.

vetkoek vendor

MUST TRY KASI FOOD
  • Amagwinya – vetkoek. Fillings range from jam to polony.
  • Amanqina enkukhu (walkie talkies) – chicken feet
  • Kota (bunny chow) – popular in Gauteng, fillings include chips, Russian sausages, with achar
  • Lamb stew and dombolo – steamed bread (also good with umleqwa)
  • Mogodu (ulusu) – tripe, served with dombolo or umngqusho 
  • Sheep liver – cooked in sheep fat.
  • Shisa nyama (spellings vary) – meat on the braai, sometimes with a special sauce.
  • Smiley (skaapskop) – slow cooked sheep’s head. (Cow’s head is more popular in some regions)
  • Umqombothi – maize and sorghum beer
  • spaza shop, Langa

    spaza shop, Langa

The Next Chapter on Kasi Cuisine

It is surprising that as the foods known to the majority of the population, there still remains a cloak of mystery that shrouds it for the remainder of South Africans.

Renowned food writer and cookbook author Dorah Sithole laments the scarcity of books on local, traditional cuisine. Food developer and blogger Thuli Gogela is a lone online presence sharing modern twists on kasi cuisine at Mzansi Style Cuisine blog.

On a positive note, Mlambo’s show, the annual Soweto Food Festival and voices like that of the Tempi’s, Letlala and Gogela solicit active community participation.

Motsogi (T.K) Motsogi, a tour guide with JMT Tours in Johannesburg admits to not having a dedicated food tour for the region, but incorporating food in existing tours.

“I had some tourists from the Netherlands recently. We took them to the chisa nyma and to watch some bands playing in Soweto. They were mind-blown,” he shares, “The guys providing the services in the townships are happy to see how the market is slowing coming in.”

And while there is the danger that inviting tourists into townships could verge into exploitative slum tourism or ‘poorism’, there exists a vibrant, entrepreneurial spirit of development that should be shared.

And how better to enjoy the lifestyle than over a plate of South African township food  samp and beans, chicken stew and a refreshing glass of ginger beer?

Mandela Cookbook Dust Jacket Final.indd

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Revival of Interest in South African Township Food appeared first on Food and the Fabulous.

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Food Sun, 23 Feb 2014 21:31:00 +0200
Henry Highland Garnet, ‘Let The Monster Perish’ http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/fashion/item/34490-henry-highland-garnet-let-the-monster-perish.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/fashion/item/34490-henry-highland-garnet-let-the-monster-perish.html

On 12th February, 1865, Rev. Henry Highland Garnet, a former slave and later pastor of the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C., became the first African American to speak in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. Rev. Henry Highland Garnet sermon was delivered within days of Congresss adoption of the 13th Amendment...

On 12th February, 1865, Rev. Henry Highland Garnet, a former slave and later pastor of the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C., became the first African American to speak in the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. Rev. Henry Highland Garnet sermon was delivered within days of Congresss adoption of the 13th Amendment banning slavery.  Republican [&]

The post Henry Highland Garnet, Let The Monster Perish appeared first on All Black Woman.

Read more http://www.allblackwoman.com/2014/02/12/henry-highland-garnet-let-monster-perish/

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Fashion Wed, 12 Feb 2014 07:24:00 +0200
African Home Decor Part II http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/fashion/item/34489-african-home-decor-part-ii.html http://www.izimbabwe.co.zw/lifestyle/fashion/item/34489-african-home-decor-part-ii.html

I wanted to share with you more on African home decor ideas, as I was mentally mapping my dream home and placing every detail from the colours of the walls to the smallest finishes, African home decor was heartily invited to add warmth, the feeling of true living, to entice mother earth inside my home and [&]

The post African Home Decor Part...

I wanted to share with you more on African home decor ideas, as I was mentally mapping my dream home and placing every detail from the colours of the walls to the smallest finishes, African home decor was heartily invited to add warmth, the feeling of true living, to entice mother earth inside my home and [&]

The post African Home Decor Part II appeared first on All Black Woman.

Read more http://www.allblackwoman.com/2014/02/12/african-home-decor-part-ii/

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Fashion Wed, 12 Feb 2014 06:45:00 +0200